Anatomists’ perspective on boosting bioethics in medical education

  • Dinesh Kumar Assistant Professor, department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Institute of Medical Sciences Puducherry- 605006 http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8234-2829
  • Magi Murugan Associate Professor of Anatomy, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry
  • Rema Devi Professor and Head of Anatomy, and Head, UNESCO Bioethics Unit, Chair of Haifa, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry
Keywords: Anatomy, Cadaver, Cadaver ceremonies, Ethics, Professional identity, Professionalism

Abstract

The last few decades have witnessed the emergence of the field of bioethics. Students entering medical college face unique ethically charged situations. Cadaveric dissection is one such area of ethical uncertainty. Studies have shown that an appropriate orientation towards the values inherent in a doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues, and society might help medical students learn how to navigate ethical dilemmas they face. The aim of this article is to examine the feasibility of incorporating ethics teaching in anatomy education, and to emphasize the crucial role of professional identity in shaping the inner image of the “to-be” physician. We also discuss ways by which professional identity can be emphasized right from the 1st-year of medical school. Such endeavors may help learners find ways to respond ethically in their professional life. Understanding the role of bioethics in anatomy education with regard to professional identity formation can guide policy-makers and medical educationists.

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Author Biographies

Dinesh Kumar, Assistant Professor, department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Institute of Medical Sciences Puducherry- 605006

Assistant Professor,
department of Anatomy,
Jawaharlal Institute of Medical Sciences
Puducherry- 605006

Magi Murugan, Associate Professor of Anatomy, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry

Associate Professor of Anatomy, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences

Rema Devi, Professor and Head of Anatomy, and Head, UNESCO Bioethics Unit, Chair of Haifa, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry

Professor and Head of Anatomy, and Head, UNESCO Bioethics Unit, Chair of Haifa, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, Puducherry

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Published
2019-02-11
How to Cite
Kumar, D., Murugan, M., & Devi, R. (2019). Anatomists’ perspective on boosting bioethics in medical education. Research & Humanities in Medical Education, 6, 21-26. Retrieved from https://www.rhime.in/ojs/index.php/rhime/article/view/191
Section
Perspective